art of palestine and the palestinian diaspora


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Oct 4, 2013
@ 2:05 am
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isqineeha:

Glass Village in Al Khalil (1977) - Palestinian Artist SAMIRA BADRAN

What I find to be very fascinating of Samira’s paintings and drawings specifically is how the themes, colors, and the general impression they radiate seem to succeed and surpass the period they were painted during. Especially when being compared with other Middle Eastern artists during the 1970s.

isqineeha:

Glass Village in Al Khalil (1977) - Palestinian Artist SAMIRA BADRAN

What I find to be very fascinating of Samira’s paintings and drawings specifically is how the themes, colors, and the general impression they radiate seem to succeed and surpass the period they were painted during. Especially when being compared with other Middle Eastern artists during the 1970s.


Photoset

Oct 4, 2013
@ 1:59 am
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30 notes

isqineeha:

Twins (1977) - Palestinian Artist SAMIRA BADRAN


Photoset

Sep 22, 2013
@ 2:52 am
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106 notes

isqineeha:

To Be Continued (2009) Performed by Saleh Bakri - Sharif Waked

To Be Continued references the “living martyr” videos. They document a man or woman posing to be filmed for the last time alive, announcing the will and determination to carry out a suicide operation among their enemies.

This video re-enacts this scene but confiscates the living martyr’s final text. It entangles him in another text that was also narrated between life and death. The living martyr is made over into the narrator of A Thousand and One Nights. He tells the tales of Scheherazade, one of the most powerful and famous women in the word of literature.

To Be Continued overturns the familiar videos of the suicide bombers’ last will and testament through an unending process of reading and narrating. It transforms this terrifying moment of sacrifice, the killing of the self and the other—into a state of perpetual postponement. - Sharif Waked

Watch an Excerpt from the Video Here.

(via tatreezconsciousness-deactivate)


Photo

Apr 28, 2013
@ 2:43 pm
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2 notes

Larissa Sansour and Oreet Ashery, from Falafel Road, 2010Video, web"Did Israel steal the falafel from the Palestinians? This seemingly silly question is a precursor to an investigation into the intentional and systematic hijacking and eradication of Palestinian cultural history by the state of Israel.The London residency took place for the whole month of February 2010. During this time, Sansour and Ashery addressed forms of cultural colonialism in relation to the Middle East through the outlandish and irregular means they have begun to develop in their book The Novel of Nonel and Vovel.Falafel Road comprised a series of publicly engaged meals at various eateries in London, including supermarkets and market stalls. The public and specially invited guests joined Ashery and Sansour every day during the residency for a falafel experience. Twenty meals in total were filmed, edited and shown at the end of the residency.This psycho-geographical project charts a subjective and exilic map of the falafel in London, as well map those attending the meals - a collage of friends and colleagues belonging to relevant artistic and political networks.”
Click through for source

Larissa Sansour and Oreet Ashery, from Falafel Road, 2010
Video, web

"Did Israel steal the falafel from the Palestinians? This seemingly silly question is a precursor to an investigation into the intentional and systematic hijacking and eradication of Palestinian cultural history by the state of Israel.

The London residency took place for the whole month of February 2010. During this time, Sansour and Ashery addressed forms of cultural colonialism in relation to the Middle East through the outlandish and irregular means they have begun to develop in their book The Novel of Nonel and Vovel.

Falafel Road comprised a series of publicly engaged meals at various eateries in London, including supermarkets and market stalls. The public and specially invited guests joined Ashery and Sansour every day during the residency for a falafel experience. Twenty meals in total were filmed, edited and shown at the end of the residency.

This psycho-geographical project charts a subjective and exilic map of the falafel in London, as well map those attending the meals - a collage of friends and colleagues belonging to relevant artistic and political networks.”

Click through for source


Photo

Apr 28, 2013
@ 2:22 pm
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8 notes

Ayman Yossri Daydban, Marlboro, from Flags series, 2011

Ayman Yossri Daydban, Marlboro, from Flags series, 2011


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Apr 28, 2013
@ 2:20 pm
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7 notes

Ayman Yossri Daydban, Umm Kulthoom II, 2010
print on wooden tissue boxes

Ayman Yossri Daydban, Umm Kulthoom II, 2010

print on wooden tissue boxes


Photo

Apr 16, 2013
@ 12:48 am
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207 notes

kolkhara:

Return from School - Palestinian Artist Mohammed Al Haj

kolkhara:

Return from School - Palestinian Artist Mohammed Al Haj


Photo

Apr 12, 2013
@ 4:38 pm
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29 notes

kolkhara:

Jewellery - Palestinian Artist Raeda Saadeh

kolkhara:

Jewellery - Palestinian Artist Raeda Saadeh


Photoset

Mar 24, 2013
@ 8:47 pm
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88 notes

kolkhara:

Apartheid Mind, Divided Heart - Palestinian Artist John Halaka

Maps are graphic representations of geopolitical spaces that are often charged with the mythologies of exceptionalism; personal memories; cultural attachments; spiritual belonging; and political ownership. Maps represent contested spaces with hidden histories of repression, denial and exclusion. The drawings in this series unveil the tensions of desire and denial in the contested spaces of Palestine/Israel. The images address the cultures of psychological and physical violence that engulfs both the victims and perpetrators. The images function as portraits of the hearts and minds of the oppressed and their oppressor. - John Halaka


Photoset

Mar 22, 2013
@ 10:11 am
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26 notes

kolkhara:

“Path of Least Resistance” from the “Whispers and Echoes” Series (2000)  - Palestinian Aritst John Halaka

“Whispers & Echoes” is a visual meditation on doubt, delusion, obsession and desire. The series can be characterized as an inward journey of rediscovery. The images for this series have been emotionally challenging to create because they bring to expression, and in the public light, personal issues that have been ignored, or dealt with covertly. To the attentive viewer, the images may whisper some of my interior monologues while simultaneously echoing a few of our common, albeit private struggles.

Will the images only be viewed as a window into my consciousness? Will they serve as a mirror of the viewer’s consciousness? Can they act as both a window and mirror that unsentimentally reveal glimpses of the human condition? Since the issues I explore in the paintings are certainly not unique to me. I am confident that the content of the paintings will strike a familiar, although potentially uncomfortable, cord with many viewers. The paintings may also compel a few of the viewers to begin to confront the same issues overtly. - John Halaka